29th - 31st January 2019
Krakow, Poland
Focus Day 29th January

Organised by info@tdnuk.com +44 (0) 1245 407 916

To Download the current Agenda Please Click Here

COMBAT LOGISTICS 2019 AGENDA HIGHLIGHTS

As forces become more reactive and mobile the logistics burden will increasingly shift to contractors. The growing trend in outsourcing crucial military requirements, supply chains and delivery duties has already had an improved effect in recent operations. The pre-conference focus day will analyse and assess current capabilities as well as look at future requirements that contactors can fill.

ACHIEVING EFFECTIVE USE OF SOFT SERVICES TO SUSTAIN FORCES

Having contractors on the battlefield significantly enhances sustainment capabilities, particularly around the provision of services such as cleaning, rubbish disposal and labour. Having them releases military assets and adds to niche skills, but using them depends heavily on the permissiveness of the environment. The services pre-conference day opens with a discussion around the level of risk both the military and contractors could/should/would take in order to best influence their use for Combat Logistics.

Speakers include:

HOW ENHANCED FORWARD PRESENCE IS SHAPING LOGSTICS APPROACH

Operations such as Enhanced Forward Presence has given rise to understanding the importance of establishing a network of secure bases to ensure adequate support across the supply chain. This section sets out to look at the challenges in establishing these bases lines and how industry can help overcome these problems.

Speakers include:

PROCUREMENT PROGRAMMES AND IMPACT ON CONTRACTOR PROVISION

Establishing logistics hubs in foreign deployments using local contractors can help in the ‘winning hearts and minds’. By integrating logistics from the beginning of the plan forwards, Combat Logistics can significantly tip the balance in favour of friendly forces by ensuring host nation integration.

Speakers include:

RECEIVING AND INTEGRATING THE FORCE THROUGH THE APOD

One of the most economic ways of receiving and integrating forces into new environments is to pool, exchange and unilaterally develop resources with other militaries, host nations and industry partners. On arrival in theatre the air pod is where the integration starts, both joint, international and with host nation partners. Careful consideration must be made of how best to do this with limited space, time and conflicting systems and equipment. The opening section of the heavy lift pre-conference day will look at how partner nations are using their APODs to best effect.

Speakers include:

Australia Australia

FUELLING THE FORCE IN THE APOD

One of the biggest consumable demands on logistics resources is fuel, including the delivery, storage and distribution and nowhere is this more apparent than when aircraft are involved. Rapidly deployed air bases need solutions that have the capabilities to be integrated quickly into the force. Potential problem areas can include runways that are too small or not strong enough to cope with heavy or frequent deliveries. This focus area will attempt to clarify solutions to optimise fuel solutions into theatre.

Speakers include:

SUPPORTING THE FORCE THROUGH THE APOD

The relationship between air and land forces is getting closer, with each relying on the other for support. Land forces provide security, allowing air to contribute significant value to supporting logistic requirements. The final session will review how best support will continue from the APOD and where improvements can be made.

Speakers include:

ENSURING OPERATIONAL EFFICIENCY AT REACH

Following the UN resolution Operation Serval has committed 11 nations in support of France. The speed and range of the deployment tested Logistic resources to the limit, and forced support elements ta consider whether they could provide the same level of support if they were deployed on a similar mission. Delivering effects over long chains will form the backdrop of the first day as a likely operating area presenting unique logistical challenges.

Speakers include:

MAINTAINING MOMENTUM FOR LOGISTIC MOVES

Aside from congested EMS, the biggest concern amongst military has been ensuring ease of movement back and forward between rear echelons and front lines. When a well-known unit tried to return from south to north Europe they factored in 2 weeks; the move took 4 months due. Difficulties include poor infrastructure, lack of interoperable transport hubs eg Baltic rail and heavy bureaucracy. This session will identify some of the struggles and potential solutions.

Speakers include:

VISIBILITY IN TRANSIT

Maintaining visibility in transit is a source of frustration for all stakeholders, from the user to the OEM. Near peer threats have specifically targeted deployment and sustainment capabilities and visibility must become clearer to ensure Combat Logisticians can meet increasingly complex equipment and personnel demands.

Speakers include:

WHERE TO START FOR INNOVATION IN LOGISTICS

The landscape of modern warfare has significantly changed over the last two years, blending Cold War style ‘hubs’ with Iraq/Afghan style ‘Combat Logistic Patrols’. Feedback from logistics operations in Africa, Europe and the Middle East have demonstrated a real need to invest in infrastructure, technology and outsourcing similar to those used in the commercial sector and autonomy could be the quickest way to achieve success.

Speakers include:

INCREASING THE OPTIONS FOR SUPPLY OF CONSUMABLES

No activity takes up more time for the Logistician than the regular resupply for consumables and so reasonable solutions to reduce demand must be found. This could include host nation provision, organic supply or even additive manufacturing. Stream 1 will analyse some of the possibilities that could feed current Logistic trends.

Speakers include:

UTILISING TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE DEMAND ON SUPPLY CHAINS

here are huge opportunities for technology to negate delivery times, minimise manufacturing cost and drastically reduce movement and storage requirements. The main challenges to wide scale adoption are awareness around potential solutions and how they can benefit particular nations. This session will review some of the options available.

Speakers include:

OPTIMISING SUPPORT NETWORKS

Support networks offer boundless opportunities to improve Combat Logistics, but this also enables threats such as espionage, sabotage and subversion. Cyberspace pervades all operations and so responsibility for exploiting its potential and protecting from its threats is common to all components- day two will open by focussing on conducting business effectively, whilst ensuring protection against these threats to increase the decision cycles of allied forces.

Speakers include:

NETWORKED LOGISITCS AND HOW IT CAN BENEFIT YOUR ORGANISATION

The preceding days have expanded our understanding of where the community sits in the current threat picture and how it might move forward. It seems that ICT will heavily influence our ability to do so and has the potential to impact, both positively and negatively, all stakeholders. The conference will close with a review of the lessons and practical steps to ensuring the continued success of Combat Logistics.

Speakers include:

DELIVERING LOGISTICAL SUCCESS TO THE BATTLEFIELD:

The lessons identified over the previous 3 days will be collated and applied to the following programmes and initiatives. This is your opportunity to sit with key organisations and individuals (pre-registration required) to discuss ideas and collaborative opportunities that will benefit your organisation.

Speakers include:

Serving military and government personnel receive free entry to all conference sessions, networking breaks and the exhibition room.

The 2-day meeting is preceded by Pre-Conference Mobile Forces Focus Day.

Download the confirmed agenda to view the full speaker line-up.